January Reading Wrap Up

Target: 10

Read: 8

January was not exactly a successful month for me in terms of reading. I planned on reading ten books and ended up reading only eight. So I do feel disappointed, but it’s still okay that I at least managed to read eight books. 

So without further ado here is the list of the books I read: 

Figment by Cameron Jace 

This is book 2 in the Insanity series by Cameron Jace which follows a girl named Alice Wonder who is locked in an asylum. The story continues with Alice’s adventure as she tries to navigate between reality and imagination, trying to find and stop the Wonderland Monsters from killing innocent children. Add a handsome, sweet boy who just might not be what she expected and you have a roller coaster of a book. 

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. The twists and turns and the fantastic way the author plays with psychological concepts really kept me at the edge of my seat. 

Llwellyn’s Complete Book of Correspondences by Sandra Kynes

If you’re into witchcraft or esotericism, then it’ll be good for you to give this a book a try. Someone like me who is new to this world would benefit greatly as correspondences are difficult to find at times. However, this book contains all the correspondences organized alphabetically so it is a helpful book to have around, whether you’re a beginner or at a higher level. It was a highly informative book for me. 

Childhood Disrupted by Donna Jackson Nakazawa

Childhood plays an important role when it comes to shaping our personalities, and this book tells us exactly how childhood impacts our lives as adults. The trauma we experience as kids, whether physical or psychological, it leaves a mark, the signs of which appear in our adulthood. 

Containing real life accounts of people who suffered in their childhood in one way or another, this book is an eye opener for those who believe that the trauma suffered in childhood has absolutely no effect on our lives and personalities as adults. 

This book was enlightening and an engaging read, so do give it a try if you’re looking to read something interesting in the non-fiction genre. 

Cloak and Dagger by Nenia Campbell 

This is book 1 of The IMA series by Nenia Campbell, who—in case you guys didn’t know—is one of my favorite authors ever. This follows Michael who happens to be an assassin working for the IMA. When a hacker manages to breach into the organization’s database, the IMA sends Michael to find out who’s behind it and kill the one responsible. Christina, on the other hand is an ordinary school student until she’s kidnapped by a group of people who are dead set on killing her. This follows a chain of events that lead to Christina fighting for her life all the while trying to navigate the sinister world of ruthless mercenaries. 

I love Nenia Campbell, and this is the second series that I’ve started reading by her and so far I love the first book and I’ll be reading the rest of the series as soon as I read all the other books I plan to read. The plot is intriguing as I love reading about criminal organizations and assassins just happens to be my favorite. So this book was a quick read for me, though the antagonist in the book made me want to kill him. 

Unbearable Lightness: A Story of Loss and Gain by Portia de Rossi

This memoir follows the life of actress Portia de Rossi and her journey with Anorexia and her love for food as she tries to fit in with the cutthroat world of media and stardom. 

The purity and rawness of this book was what really kept me flipping page after page. Portia de Rossi really poured her heart out in describing her battle with Anorexia and how the world forces you to change yourself just to feel accepted. And I think everyone should read this book, because no one should be pressured into changing their appearance in order to feel accepted and beautiful. 

Audacity by Melanie Crowder

This is a novel written in verse and the first of its kind that I’ve ever read and for some reason this novel did not speak to me in the way I expected it to. I’m not sure if it’s the novel itself or the format as I’ve never read a novel written in verse before. 

However, I did understand the overall context of the novel which follows a Jewish girl as she fights for equal rights at the work place. A girl who refuses to back down due to tradition and the cruel condition of the workplace. This novel is meant to inspire and it did to me to some extent, but I believe that someone else might get more out of it than I did. 

True Nature by Willow Madison

Before I give my opinion on this book, I would like to mention the trigger warnings associated with this book. This book contains abuse consensual and otherwise, so please read at your own discretion. 

So this is a dark romance book which dives into abuse and intertwining it with love. This is book 1 in the series involving Max and Lucy. Max is a man of primitive thinking and clearly knows how to treat a woman—in his opinion of course, which many of you might disagree with—while Lucy takes whatever Max dishes out. 

Though I’m all up for dark romance, I kind of found Lucy a bit too docile for my liking. She never questions how Max treats her and happily goes along with whatever he says and does. I know I’m no one to judge but it would’ve been nice if Lucy had a bit of a backbone. 

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia 

This is a contemporary novel following two high school students, one who is a popular comic artist but no one knows her identity, while our other main character writes fan fiction related to the same comic. His fan fiction is loved by everyone who is a fan of the comic. 

Eliza loves to draw but with being an introvert comes a strong desire for privacy and that’s exactly what she exhibits when she hides behind a pseudonym and dazzles the world with her comic. Whereas, Wallace passionately writes fan fiction based on Eliza’s character, and even though he’s open about his craft, he has his own closet full of secrets. And when Eliza’s secrets come out, it becomes a tricky maze of emotions and feelings as they both try to figure out what it is they truly want. 

I enjoyed this book a lot. It was cute, inspirational and downright fun. It even made me wish that I could one day have my own comic or webtoon which I can present to the world, however, I can’t even draw a straight line. Wallace and Eliza really are perfect and I intend to read more books by Francesca Zappia. 

Well there you have it. These are the eight books that I read in January. Do let me know if any of these piqued your interest and do let me know what you read in the month of January. Let’s see if I’d be able to complete the next month’s target.  

1 Comment

  1. I struggle daily with a formidable perfect-storm-like combination of adverse childhood experience trauma, autism spectrum disorder and high sensitivity, the ACE trauma in large part being due to my ASD and high sensitivity. It would be quite helpful to have books written about such or similar conditions involving a coexistence of ACE trauma and/or ASD and/or high sensitivity, the latter which seems to have a couple characteristics similar to ASD traits.

    Donna Jackson Nakazawa’s Childhood Disrupted fails to even once mention high sensitivity and/or autism spectrum disorder. [As it were, I also read a book on ASD that fails to even mention high sensitivity or ACE trauma. That was followed by a book about highly sensitive men, with no mention whatsoever of autism spectrum disorder or adverse childhood experience trauma.] Really, it’s no secret that ACE abuse/trauma is often inflicted on autistic and/or highly sensitive children and teens by their ‘neurotypical’ peers, so why not at least acknowledge it in some meaningful, constructive way?

    I therefore don’t know whether my additional, coexisting conditions will render the information and/or assigned exercises from such not-cheap books useless, or close to it, in my efforts to live much less miserably. While many/most people in my shoes would work with the books nonetheless, I cannot; I simply need to know if I’m wasting my time and, most importantly, mental efforts. …

    An additional unaddressed ‘elephant in the room’ throughout the book is: Why does/can the author only include one male among its six interviewed ACE-traumatized adult subjects? Was there such a small pool of ACE-traumatized men willing to formally tell his own story of life-changing childhood abuse?

    Could it be yet more evidence of a continuing subtle societal take-it-like-a-man mindset; one in which so many men, even in these modern times and with anonymity, still would prefer not to ‘complain’ to some stranger/author about his torturous youth, as that is what ‘real men’ do? That relatively so few men (a ratio of 5:1 female to male) suffered high-scoring ACE trauma is not a plausible conclusion, however low in formally recorded number such unfortunate male victims may be.

    I tried multiple times contacting the book’s author via internet websites in regards to this non-addressed florescent elephant in the room, but I received no response. … Perhaps, even today, there remains an anachronistic mentality out there, albeit perhaps subconscious: Men can take care of themselves, and boys are basically little men.

    Like

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